Subject:  Large green bug on my house in August
Geographic location of the bug:  Wanaque, NJ 07465 USA
Date: 09/22/2019
Time: 09:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this large green bug on the side of my house on a sunny hot afternoon in August. I live in Northern NJ not far from Ramapo State Forest. I have never seen this bug before or since. I would love to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Mark

Common True Katydid

Dear Mark,
This is a male Common True Katydid, one of the music makers of the insect world.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Deciduous forests–often heard, but seldom seen, since mostly lives in forest canopy.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Howard County, MD
Date: 09/19/2019
Time: 09:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please ID this. I found a location where they are everywhere.
How you want your letter signed:  John

Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar

Dear John,
This is a Variegated Fritillary Caterpillar.  Here is a BugGuide image for reference.

Subject:  Large green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Bangor ME
Date: 09/19/2019
Time: 06:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this caterpillar walking across the driveway toward the grass.  Having trouble identifying it.  Would appreciate your help.
How you want your letter signed:  PH

Modest Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear PH,
This is the caterpillar of a Modest Sphinx or Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we identified on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  ”  These hornworms feed upon poplar, willow, and cottonwood, are very strong and develop to quite a size.  Larvae progress very rapidly on poplar. The green of the early hornworm instars is very much like the top of the poplar leaf while the pale green of the final instar more closely resembles the color of the underside of poplar leaves.  Larvae are extremely strong with powerful mandibles.”  The caudal horn on the Modest Sphinx Caterpillar is quite insignificant compared to the horns of other caterpillars in the family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  1cm insect with 4 wings (9/15/19,6pm)
Geographic location of the bug:  Riverside, California
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 09:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug sitting on my indoor bamboo plant,it would scurry outta my sight like a squirrel on a tree. It looks like it has 2 eyes on either side but the underside that is yellow resembles the texture a flys eye.
How you want your letter signed:  V

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Dear V,
This is a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, and according to BugGuide:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.”  According to Featured Creatures, the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter:  “feeds in the xylem, the water conducting tissue of both herbaceous and woody plants. Its known host range is vast, including more than 100 plant species (Turner and Pollard). Preferred plants depend on the season and locality, but, in general, the preferred species include crape myrtle, citrus, and holly. Glassy-winged sharpshooters tend to feed on last-year’s growth and meristematic growth (Mizell and French), and excrete copious amounts of liquid as they feed. The sharpshooters ingest 100 to 300 times their dry body weight in xylem fluid per day, and in large populations, their high volume of excreta (“leafhopper rain”) can become a problem, leaving white residue on leaves.”  We have received reports of the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter on Cannabis, including this submission by a regular contributor, Constant Gardener.

Subject:  Pink Moth with Fuzzy Red Head
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found a moth with beautiful pink wings. It’s fuzzy head was a dark red with the color transitioning into the wings. Fuzzy thick arms and on its underside it was brown. It’s currently September in Central Florida. It was sitting on a window at a pharmacy.
How you want your letter signed:  🙂

Female Io Moth

Dear :),
This is a female Io Moth, but her most distinguishing physical feature is not apparent in your image.  Both female and male Io Moth have striking eyespot markings on the underwings that are hidden when the moth is at rest.  Once startled, the moth reveals the underwings, potentially frightening a predator into perceiving that it has wakened a sleeping giant that could turn around and eat the predator.  This illusion is protective mimicry.  We suspect this individual was attracted by the pharmacy lights and then decided to stay and rest during the day until the following night.

Subject:  What caterpillar and moth or butterfly will this be
Geographic location of the bug:  Chapala, mexico
Date: 09/15/2019
Time: 03:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My friend sent me a pic of this caterpillar from Chapala Mexico. After looking online I found hornworm caterpillars. Which one is this and what moth or butterfly does it turn into. Also what is the purpose of the horn?
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah

Unknown Hornworm

Dear Sarah,
We are very confident that this is a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, and that it will eventually transform into a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth, but alas, we have not been successful identifying its species despite the excellent database on Sphingidae of the Americas.  We will write to Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a species identification.

Bill Oehlke Responds.
Hi Daniel, I think I have seen that one before, but a quick check did not let me come up with an id. Later this afternoon I will send it to Jean Haxaire to see if he knows what it is.
Bill

Daniel,
Jean Haxaire has indicated Isognathus rimosus inclitus.
I wish permission to post it to website. Please check with photographer and forward his or her name.
Bill

Ed. Note:  The subspecies Isognathus rimosus inclitus is pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas, but there is no larval image.  We are writing back to Sarah with the identification and a request from Bill Oehlke to include the image on his comprehensive site.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks so much. I’m checking with my friend and am getting an exact location if possible. I’m sure she’ll be alright with sharing, but will get back to you tomorrow.
Sarah

Hi Daniel,
Pilar Martinez is the photographer and the pic was taken in Chapala, Jalisco , Mexico
Pilar has said ok to sharing the image. I’m copying her on this email.
Thank you so much for the identification and glad to contribute to the database.
Please send us a link when it’s up.

Thanks Sarah and Pilar,
Pilar’s image is already live on What’s That Bug? and Bill Oehlke will post it to the species page for
 Isognathus rimosus inclitus on his site, Sphingidae of the Americas, where he has adult moths of  pictured, but no caterpillars.