Subject:  Is this a bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  CH43 9AJ
Date: 07/13/2019
Time: 03:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this? Is it a bee?
How you want your letter signed:  ??

Honeysuckle Sawfly

Dear ??,
We had no idea where CH43 9AJ is located, but a web search produced:  “
CH43 9AJ. Postal code in Birkenhead, England.”  This is a Sawfly, a non-stinging relative of Bees and Wasps.  Based on an image on NatureSpot, we are quite confident it is Zaraea fasciata, and the site states:  “Uncommon with most British records coming from England and Wales.”  According to UK Wildlife, it is commonly called the Honeysuckle Sawfly.

Honeysuckle Sawfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Lostwood national wildlife refuge North west North Dakota
Date: 07/13/2019
Time: 05:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  Unable to find this beetle in any North Dakota books.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

This is a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be Nuttail’s Blister Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on legumes, other forbs.”

Nuttail’s Blister Beetle

Subject:  black spotted white bumblebee?
Geographic location of the bug:  pennsylvania
Date: 07/13/2019
Time: 06:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I spotted this bug after it landed on a blade of grass and hung there behind me. I originally thought it was a carpenter bee because that’s what it sounded like flying by. However, when I turned around and saw what it I was shocked. It was pretty docile and hung out upside down for about 8 minutes of the same blade of grass, and was calm enough to call several people over to it to check it out. I am so interested to see what this is!
How you want your letter signed:  Lyndsey Mertz

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Lyndsey,
This is a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus Cuterebra, but we would require an expert opinion regarding the species.  We will attempt to contact Jeff Boettner for assistance in this matter.  According to BugGuide:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and ‘runs’ of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”  this is our first Bot Fly image this season.  They are such unusual looking creatures and they are frequently mistaken for Bumblebees.

Rodent Bot Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this an Abotts Sphinx caterpillar?
Geographic location of the bug:  St. Claude Manitoba
Date: 07/12/2019
Time: 10:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you verify which caterpillar this may be? He’s been munching on my grape vine leaves.
How you want your letter signed:  Pauline

Abbott’s Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Pauline,
This is indeed one of the color variations of the Abbott’s Sphinx caterpillar which you can verify on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “Larvae feed at night on grape (
Vitis) and ampelopsis (Ampelopsis) and hide on the bark of their host plants during the day.”

Subject:  Daughter caught a curiosity
Geographic location of the bug:  Lincoln City, Oregon
Date: 07/12/2019
Time: 10:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So another submission… my daughter Chloe caught this fella in her camping catch kit… we’re super excited to hear back from ya buggy folks as we dunno what this battle scared fella (or gal as Chloe says) is
How you want your letter signed:  Joe and kitty bit

Tiger Moth

Dear Joe and kitty bit,
This is a wasp-mimic Tiger Moth in the genus
Ctenucha, probably Ctenucha multifaria based on this BugGuide image.

Subject:  Pretty little thing
Geographic location of the bug:  North of Istanbul Turkey
Date: 07/11/2019
Time: 03:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This little thing is pretty. I’d love to know what it is, what it will turn into (if any thing) and if it is pousinous. Thank you very much in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Aycha Warner

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Aycha,
This is a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the family Saturniidae.  Based on this FlickR image, it appears to be
Saturnia pyri. According to Nature Documentaries, where it is called Aristotle’s Silkworm:  “Saturnia pyri is the largest moth in Europe. It lives in Southern Europe, parts of Asia and North Africa but it occasionally makes a northward move.”