Subject:  Please let me know more about this object
Geographic location of the bug:  Limbe, Cameroon, Africa
Date: 03/23/2019
Time: 05:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
Been seeing these strange insects around the house recently so wanted learn about them more ( not too long ago I even saw 2 brahminy snakes).
For more precision about the insect on the picture, at a certain point it was able to mimic a small piece of wood by straightening his whole body like an | (All legs behind and stiking to the body with his 2 things?? in front perfectly straightened forward).
Well thanks for your time and patience.
How you want your letter signed:  Sally

Water Scorpion

Dear Sally,
This is a predatory Water Scorpion, an aquatic True Bug that is capable of flying from pond to pond.  Handle Water Scorpions with caution as they can deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant caterpillar burrowing under dead leaves
Geographic location of the bug:  Miami, florida
Date: 03/22/2019
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! My students and I found this giant caterpillar traveling down a tree trunk and o haven’t been able to identify it. It’s about 5-6” in length and after it reached the ground it burrowed under th dead leaves in the ground and stayed there.
How you want your letter signed:  Nadia in miami

Fig Sphinx

Dear Nadia,
This large caterpillar is a Fig Sphinx,
Pachylia ficus, and it was on the ground searching for a place to pupate among the leaf litter.  There must be a fig tree near the sighting.

Subject:  Red and black bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Fountain valley, ca
Date: 03/23/2019
Time: 03:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Bugman!
I found three of these today on a milkweed (which I planted to attract monarchs). Two of them were mating. I live in Orange County, California, about five miles from the coast.  Any idea what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer

Large Milkweed Bug

Dear Jennifer,
This is a benign Large Milkweed Bug and it will not harm your milkweed plants.  According to BugGuide, they eat:  “Seeds of milkweed plants. They can be reared and fed other seeds such as sunflower, watermelon, cashew”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider/beetle/ant?
Geographic location of the bug:  Estrella, Arizona
Date: 03/20/2019
Time: 10:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These guys were everywhere off the side of the road in the washout area but now we can’t figure out what they were!
How you want your letter signed:  CJSM

Desert Harvestman

Dear CJSM,
Though it resembles a Spider, this Harvestman in the order Opiliones is a related, non-venomous Arachnid.  Thanks to the Sonoran Desert Naturalist site, we identified it as a Desert Harvestman in the genus
Eurybunus.  The site states:  “Desert Harvestmen, like most other harvestmen are probably scavengers that feed on dead insects. They are harmless and do not bite or possess venom. Probably the most astonding feature beyond the ultra-slender legs is the mid-body turret upon which the simple eyes are attached.”  According to BugGuide:  “Adults found in winter and Spring.”  

Subject:  Beetle id needed
Geographic location of the bug:  Kitchen Creek Falls Trail, Cleveland Nat’l Forest,CA
Date: 03/20/2019
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  is this another Shining Leaf Chafer: Paracotalpa puncticollis ?
How you want your letter signed:  Terri V

Little Bear Scarab, we believe

Dear Terri,
We believe you have the genus correct, but we are not certain of the species, though because of its dark coloration, we are leaning toward a different Little Bear Scarab,
Paracotalpa ursina based on this BugGuide image from San Diego.  The posting includes a comment stating:  “Paracotalpa ursina, dark form. Very common in that area on Chamise this time of year.”

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Pacific Northwest
Date: 03/18/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDTYour letter to the bugman
Early spring: I found many of these inside the rotting stem of my artichoke plants. They’re less than 1/2 inch on length, are legless,  and move a little like a caterpillar but with much less flexibility.
How you want your letter signed:  a gardener

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

Dear Gardener,
This is most certainly the larva of a Fly, generally called a Maggot, and our best guess at this point is that it is the larva of
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly pictured on BugGuide that feeds on artichokes.  Alas, we have not been able to locate any images of the larvae.  Bug Safari has additional images of the adult Fly.

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem