Subject:  spider
Geographic location of the bug:  India
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 06:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I would love to know more about this beautiful spider whose picture I have attached for you. I have no complaints,  curiousity pulls me here. I found it jumping among the flowerpots one day and it was very swift. I love its colour. The spider was 1 cm and blue-green. 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  ugh

Jumping Spider

Dear ugh,
This is a male Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  Jumping Spiders are considered harmless, and they do not spin webs to snare prey.  Instead, they have excellent eyesight and they are able to pounce on prey from a considerable distance with amazing accuracy.  Many Jumping Spiders have metallic markings and bright colors.  We have not found any matching images online in our quick search, so we cannot provide you with an exact species at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a link to a species identification.

Jumping Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identity
Geographic location of the bug:  NJ
Date: 02/18/2019
Time: 11:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in our house yesterday. Haven’t seen anymore. Curious what this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Wayne

Tick

Dear Wayne,
Do you have a dog or other pet that goes outside?  This is a very well fed Tick, meaning it is engorged with blood.

Subject:  Green caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  South Africa, highveld
Date: 02/19/2019
Time: 09:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These are about an inch long, and are aggressively moving through my garden. May be responsible for some painful skin reactions, but unconfirmed. Any idea what they are, and what they’ll turn into?
How you want your letter signed:  Jon

Stinging Slug Caterpillars

Dear Jon,
These are Stinging Slug Caterpillars in the family Limocodidae and we have previously identified them as
Latoia vivida.  Stinging Slug Caterpillars should be handled with extreme caution as they are capable of delivering a painful sting.

Wow, that was fast. Thank you so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please I’d this insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Illinois
Date: 02/17/2019
Time: 04:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Went camping with my Boy Scouts in sandwich Illinois.  Found this bug when we brought our gear home.  Unsure what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Ben Bentley Scoutmaster Troop 102

Masked Hunter

Dear Ben,
This is a Masked Hunter, the immature form of a predatory Assassin Bug that has a sticky exoskeleton.  Debris sticks to the Masked Hunter, effectively camouflaging it.  Masked Hunters should be handled with caution.  Though the bite is not considered dangerous, it can be painful.

Subject:  lage wasp like
Geographic location of the bug:  Suriname, South America
Date: 02/17/2019
Time: 08:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi i live in Suriname and never came across this bug before. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Marlon

Tarantula Hawk

Dear Marlon,
This appears to be a Tarantula Hawk in the genus
Pepsis, or a closely related genus.  Female Tarantula Hawks prey upon Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders, stinging them to paralyze them.  The paralyzed Tarantula is buried after the female Tarantula Hawk lays an egg.  When the egg hatches, the larva feeds on the still living, but paralyzed Tarantula.

Subject:  Unknown Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  California Coastal
Date: 02/16/2019
Time: 12:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I keep finding these bugs dead on my floor. I opened some boxes from overseas so that my be where they came from.
How you want your letter signed:  Simon

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Simon,
You are correct that this Terrestrial Amphipod, commonly called a Lawn Shrimp or House Hopper, is from oversees, however, we do not believe it came from your boxes.  Lawn Shrimp have been reported in Southern California for many years.  According to BugGuide, their range is “Southeastern Australia (New South Wales and Victoria), as well as nearby areas of the Pacific, but introduced into New Zealand, the British Isles, Florida and California” and “Non-native; introduced probably from Australia along with blue-gum eucalyptus trees in the 1800s. First recorded in San Francisco, CA in 1967.”  They are not usually noticed until we have soaking rains and they seek shelter from the water-soaked ground.  BugGuide notes:  “These are rarely seen except when flooding or lack of moisture forces them to abandon their home in the soil in search for suitable conditions. At such times they often end up dieing on pavement or in homes and become a nuisance. Once they start appearing, there’s not much that can be done except to sweep them up- pesticides are pointless, bcause by then they’re already dying or dead.”